Tag Archives: SFL

Interpersonal modal Adjunct v Experiential Circumstance

I always do that. (Adjunct) I do that all the time. (Circumstance) I usually do that. (Adjunct) I do that almost everyday. (Circumstance) I often do that. (Adjunct) I do that at times. (Circumstance) I sometimes do that. (Adjunct) I … Continue reading

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Field of discourse

Here is a recipe for Lemon Risotto from http://www.epicurious.com: We know this is a recipe, and not say a research report, partly through the field of discourse. Within the context of situation, field refers to: what is happening, to the … Continue reading

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Directions Game

I added a game to the Resources page that practises giving directions. I use it especially with Junior/Senior High School kids. Usually the language of commands is introducted, understandable enough, with giving directions around town (turn left at High Street). The … Continue reading

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Clause vs Sentence

The difference between a clause and a sentence can be difficult, but important. A clause basically must have a Finite whereas a sentence is just an orthographic convention beginning with a capital and ending with a full stop. Here is … Continue reading

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Discourse function of “How are you?”

A bit further to my post on the XKCD comic, I’ve been spending time recently in class on the discourse function of “How are you?”. While it may seem like a small and basic point I think it actually gets … Continue reading

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In defence of “How was your weekend?”

Recently, a (Japanese) staff member came up to me and said that a student had asked her, “Why do teachers always ask ‘How was your weekend?’”. We ended up having an interesting chat about the role of ‘casual conversation’ in … Continue reading

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Genre of cooking classes

Further to my last post on recipes, I’d also highly recommend an interesting read on similar differences between American and Japanese cooking classes in: Mayes, P., 2003, Language, Social Structure, and Culture: A Genre Analysis of Cooking Classes in Japan and … Continue reading

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Activity: tenor, language choice and procedures

Here is an slightly different take on teaching the genre of procedures. The lesson was on giving ‘how-to’ instructions, for example ‘how to buy a ticket at train station’ or ‘how to make cup noodles’. Usually I would just teach … Continue reading

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Conversation

Here’s a XKCD strip: It’s often said that you can’t ‘teach conversation’ yet I think this is only partly true. Of course it’s not possible to teach how to have a conversation, that comes naturally and unfolds as the situation and participants … Continue reading

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Activity: Jobs – have to/get to and appraisal

For Elementary and pre-Intermediate students, ‘jobs’ are often used to introduce various grammatical structures, especially, to compare ‘have to’ (A police officer has to arrest people) with ‘must’ (A police officer must be brave). This comparison, to me, doesn’t seem to … Continue reading

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